The Death Defying Double Somersault of Love


221 notes

biologyhearts:

Went on a mother’s day walk

27 notes oakapples:

Vita Sackville-West as Virginia Woolf’s Orlando in 1928. Forgot to mention that I saw the original manuscript of Orlando at Knole the other day. :)

oakapples:

Vita Sackville-West as Virginia Woolf’s Orlando in 1928. Forgot to mention that I saw the original manuscript of Orlando at Knole the other day. :)

31 notes "I’ll tell you what we’ll do: We’ll ban zero hours contracts, increase the minimum wage, incentivise a living wage, get big business to pay their taxes and cut taxes for the little guys, freeze energy bills for today’s householders and build homes for tomorrow’s. We’ll guarantee jobs for young people - spreading the success of Jobs Growth Wales right across Britain. We’ll reinstate the 50p rate and pay off the deficit at a sensible rate. We’ll tax bankers bonuses and get them lending again We’ll rebuild and rebalance Britain - strengthening the economy outside the M25, not just within it. Conference, we’ll scrap the Bedroom Tax, like the Poll Tax before it, the kitemark of Tory inequality and injustice." —

- Extract from Owen Smith MP’s fab speech at the 2014 Welsh Labour Conference

{x}

(via aranrhod)

10 notes
Anonymous: Why do you support labour as opposed to, say, Green which arguably have more socialist policies?

aranrhod:

I do support the Green Party (though with dubiousness - there are so many different elements in there and some of them are Not Good) and am considering voting for them in the European Election next month as it’s a proportional system. But in terms of the General Election next year, I will definitely be voting Labour.

My relationship with Labour is kind of like being a fan of a football club that used to be really good and could be good again but right now it keeps fucking up (aka mostly exasperation but with occasional twinges of hope). I definitely don’t agree with everything Labour does and says, and most of the time I want to shake Ed Miliband and tell him to get his act together (I totally think Owen Smith would make a better leader). But they are the largest left-wing party and they are neither homogeneous nor unchangeable. There are some amazing people in Labour, as MPs, AMs, Councillors and campaigners - proper socialist people with fire in their guts who really, truly believe in creating a better society. Those are the ones I’m rooting for. And I think if more of those people became active in Labour it could shift the direction of the party (and I think the shift is happening right now, if you look at some of their policies for the next term). That’s why I joined, anyway. And I know it’s very difficult when a lot of the party is made up of old careerist politicians who don’t have that passion, but they don’t make up the whole party.

At the end of the day, Labour is the only way we’re going to get the Tories out. They are a mass party, formed for working class people and vastly made up of working class people, and if people work with Labour rather than against it I think we could see really great things coming from it.

(I could say a lot more about this w/r/t specific policies but really need to do actual work. I’m a big fan of all-women shortlists, 50p tax, getting rid of the bedroom tax, tax breaks for living wage employers, etc. They could be doing WAY more, but generally I approve.)

1 note

I went to Manchester library for the first time since it reopened and I kinda ran around like an over excited kid holding about ten books at once. I got out:

Condition of the Working Class in England - Engels

Russian Short Stories from Pushkin to Buida

Conversations with Stalin - Milovan Djilas

The Wretched of the Earth - Fanon

The Bird’s Nest - Shirley Jackson

At the library cafe there was some older women sitting at my table, and one of them whispered to the others “The staff (two of whom had Eastern European? accents) are foreigners”. It was so weird, they were almost scandalized. 

And then I went to Manchester Museum and drew picture of dead birds! 

16,367 notes benjamingrimes:

Blood Moon eclipse. Next time I’m going to rent a longer lens.
4/15/14

benjamingrimes:

Blood Moon eclipse. Next time I’m going to rent a longer lens.

4/15/14

(via gentle-insomnia)

4,802 notes

Spring in Stockholm

(Source: timelistens, via fakjumather)

26 notes

oakapples:

Polylepis- my favourite genus of trees at the moment. There are 28 species, all in the tropical Andes. Some can be found in considerable numbers above 5,000 m, making them the highest-growing arborescent angiosperms in the world.

173 notes

oakapples:

The drawing room, with its 18th-century Chinese wallpaper and 17th-century Chinese cabinet.

15 notes oakapples:

For me, the most extraordinary room in Knole House is the Brown Gallery. I couldn’t find a photograph, so here’s a painting completed in 1909 by Charles Essenhigh Corke. Right along the length of the gallery hang portraits of members of Knole’s Sackville family, as well as numerous English and Scottish royals, aristocrats, privy councillors, and foreign princes. It really is like a ‘who’s who’ for the 16th and 17th centuries.

I believe this to be where Orlando was slicing the Moor’s head?

oakapples:

For me, the most extraordinary room in Knole House is the Brown Gallery. I couldn’t find a photograph, so here’s a painting completed in 1909 by Charles Essenhigh Corke. Right along the length of the gallery hang portraits of members of Knole’s Sackville family, as well as numerous English and Scottish royals, aristocrats, privy councillors, and foreign princes. It really is like a ‘who’s who’ for the 16th and 17th centuries.

I believe this to be where Orlando was slicing the Moor’s head?